Sunday, June 26, 2016

Saturday work party 7/2/16

Greetings Friends of Lincoln Park, we have an Independence Day work party coming up! It's going to be a beautiful day in the woods.
  • Saturday, July 2 9am to noon
  • Meet near the north parking lot kiosk (Fauntleroy Way SW and SW Rose St)
  • Long sleeves and pants, with sturdy shoes or boots suggested for protection
We will have special guests all the way from Austin TX on Saturday. Five young adults from the Deaf Youth Ministry of Texas will be joining us. They are on a service trip to Seattle. Should be a great team! Join us to welcome the Texans!

And if you haven't already done so, be sure to go to our blog to see Mark Ahlness's gorgeous photos of the phantom orchids in Lincoln Park. This year Stewart Wechsler has found orchids in 6 different locations. The blog has a great write up about the orchids done by Stewart    

Phantom Orchid from June 24
Photos from all 2016 locations are here.
Sharon Baker
Volunteer Forest Steward
Friends of Lincoln Park

Wednesday, June 15, 2016

Sunday work party 6/19/16

Greetings Friends of Lincoln Park, We have a maintenance work party coming up. We will be going back to an area we've previously put in restoration (cleared invasives and planted natives) and catch up with any new invasive plants that have appeared. This is vitally important to the restoration process, we don't want to lose ground! 
  • Sunday, June 19th, 9am to noon
  • Meet near the north parking lot kiosk (Fauntleroy Way SW and SW Rose St)
  • Long sleeve/pants and sturdy shoes or boots suggested for protection
Huckleberries in Lincoln Park
The forecast is for a sunny day, join us for a restorative day of forest restoration! Sharon 

Sharon Baker
Volunteer Forest Steward
Friends of Lincoln Park
206.464.1068 cell

Monday, May 30, 2016

Saturday Work Party, 6/4/16


Greetings Friends of Lincoln Park, we have a work party coming up next Saturday. The weather forecast calls for mostly sunny, so should be a wonderful day to be in the woods.
  • Saturday, June 4th 9am to noon
  • Meet near the north parking lot kiosk (Fauntleroy Way SW and SW Rose St)
  • Long sleeves and pants, with sturdy shoes or boots suggested for protection
You've likely noticed, Lincoln Park is an amazing place. The phantom orchids are back! Go to our blog for photos by Mark Ahlness and a write up by Stewart Wechsler:
And check out the website below for a very good article by Nathan Collins on how natural areas make cities more livable and healthy. Our work really matters!

Sharon

May 7 work party , with UW students joining in
Sharon Baker
Volunteer Forest Steward
Friends of Lincoln Park
206.464.1068 cell

Saturday, May 21, 2016

Return of the Phantom Orchid

(Guest post from Stewart Wechsler)

May 21, 2016
While Lincoln Park is blessed to have a number of indigenous plants that survive nowhere else in Seattle, there is one of these that stands out like no other, as both beautiful and the most unique and special. It is the Phantom Orchid – Cephalanthera austiniae (in older references as Eburophyton austiniae). This plant has no leaves and no chlorophyll, and it has nothing visible above ground when it is not flowering or setting seed. With no leaves and chlorophyll, you ask how does it grow? It is fully dependent on the fungus underground that it is attached to, while the fungus is dependent on the tree roots that it is attached to. So if anyone would get the bad idea that they might want this beautiful and unique flower in their garden, they should know that if it is dug up, it is killed, because the essential 3 way connection between the orchid, the fungus and the tree is broken. Not only is there nothing visible above ground when it isn't bloom and seed time, they don't bloom every year, and the number of flower stalks that come up in any year they do bloom is quite variable. Phantom Orchids have been recorded not blooming for up to 17 years then blooming again. At Lincoln Park the first place I found one flower stalk, about 10 years ago, it sent up another stalk for each of the next 2 years, but since then I haven't seen any flowers at that spot. While I suspect that orchid is dead, each year I keep checking, because I can't know. No wonder these pale flower stalks, with flowers that have no more pigment than a yellow lower lip, that appear, then disappear, are called “Phantom” Orchids.

The time I first found a Phantom Orchid in Lincoln Park, there had only been one University of Washington herbarium record of this species for King County. It was one collected in 1937, by Sister Mary Milburge. Where? ­ In Lincoln Park! (Since then a second Phantom Orchid was collected in King County in the Preston area.) Due to its rarity statewide, the Phantom Orchid is on the state's rare and protected plant list. 

July 4, 2015
The biggest reason to tell people about these orchids, in spite of some risk that some rudely inconsiderate person might try digging one up, is to use the problem they have had to teach people about a problem for the park's whole natural community. Every year that these orchids do bloom, a number of the flower stalks are knocked down before they can set seed. It seems most likely this is from the heavy traffic in the park of off trail, off leash and long leash dogs, with claws designed for digging, and who dig the forest floor and its vegetation with every leap, every pull, and sometimes just for fun. Last year we had 5 orchid stalks come up, but 3 were trampled before they could exchange pollen with another orchid and set seed. If our remaining Phantom Orchids don't produce seed before they die, Lincoln Park will have no more Phantom Orchids. So before you allow your dog to run free in this most special remaining piece of nature left in Seattle, consider the dilemma of our Phantom Orchids struggling to have sex and babies before they die!

­Stewart Wechsler
www.stewardshipadventures.com

(pictures by Mark Ahlness)

Thursday, May 12, 2016

Sunday work party, 5/15/16


Greetings Friends of Lincoln Park, we've got a maintenance work party coming up next Sunday.
  • Sunday, May 15th, 9am to noon
  • Meet near the north parking lot kiosk (Fauntleroy Way SW and SW Rose St)
  • Long sleeves and pants suggested for protection, with sturdy shoes or boots.
There's a great article by Heath Jones in the Washington Trails Association magazine for May-June 2016. The subject is the health benefits of being in nature. Great summary! She quotes John Muir:
"Man needs beauty as well as bread, places to play in and pray in, where nature may heal and give strength to the body and soul."
Join us for a great dose of nature, Jones calls it the "new alternative medicine". Sharon
Part of the May 7 work party
Sharon Baker
Volunteer Forest Steward
Friends of Lincoln Park
206.464.1068 cell

Tuesday, May 3, 2016

Saturday work party, 5/7/16

Greetings Friends of Lincoln Park. We've got a work party coming up next Saturday. There are so many vigorous weeds coming up at this time of the year, that I think we need to devote another work party to attacking the invaders in areas we've already placed in restoration. We'll likely work at the north end of the park again.
  • Saturday, May 7th, 9am to noon
  • Meet near the north parking lot kiosk (Fauntleroy Way SW and SW Rose St)
  • Long sleeves and pants suggested for protection, with sturdy shoes or boots
Please join us, we've got lots of good, healthy work to do! Sharon
Mahonia nervosa, south end of the park, a native
Sharon Baker
Volunteer Forest Steward
Friends of Lincoln Park
206.464.1068 cell

Monday, April 11, 2016

Sunday work party, April 17, 2016

Greeting Friends of Lincoln Park. We have a maintenance work party coming up. This is the time of the year when invasive plants try to get a head start on natives in areas we've already placed in restoration. We need to cut them off (actually, pull them out) early! Join us!
  • Sunday, April 17th 9am to noon
  • Meet near north parking lot kiosk (Fauntleroy Way SW and SW Rose St)
  • Long sleeves/pants, sturdy shoes or boots suggested for protection. 
  • Bring rain gear, you never know!
  • Bring garden gloves, if you have them, or we'll have extras, we have tools.
The park is coming alive at this time of the year, we'll need to be alert to nesting birds, etc. It's a wonderful time of the year to appreciate beautiful Lincoln! Sharon
Red-flowering Currant
Sharon Baker
Volunteer Forest Steward
Friends of Lincoln Park
206.464.1068 cell