About


Who are the Friends of Lincoln Park (FLiP)?
FLiP is an informal collection of volunteers who love and deeply appreciate Lincoln Park. We show our appreciation by working to remove invasive plant species and to help steward and maintain the health and beauty of the park’s urban forest. We keep coming back because we have fun doing it!

Interested in joining us for a work party?
Volunteers work in the park on the first Saturday and third Sunday of every month from 9am to noon. We work rain or shine, but cancel if there are high wind warnings. Meet at the kiosk in the north parking lot (Fauntleroy Way SW and SW Rose St) at 9am. We’d love to have you join us! 

What to wear and what to bring:
We recommend volunteers wear sturdy shoes or boots and long sleeves/pants year round for protection from brambles, etc. The dress code is “northwest layers”. Bring gardening gloves and hand clippers, if you have them. We will have gloves and tools available too. The work is fun and is great for your physical and mental health as well as for our planet. To learn more, contact our forest steward:
    Sharon Baker 206 464 1068 sabaker41@gmail.com

About Lincoln Park
Lincoln Park is located in West Seattle, just north of the Fauntleroy Ferry dock. (8011 Fauntleroy Way SW).  It is on the shores of Puget Sound, with about a mile of salt water beach and is comprised of 135 acres. Recreational opportunities include a salt water pool (open in the summer only), ball fields, playground areas, a wading pool, picnic shelters and miles of trails for hiking, biking, running, birding, etc. 

The land was acquired by Seattle for a park, on the recommendation of the Olmstead brothers, in 1922, although the park was not designed by the Olmsteads.  Of the 135 acres at Lincoln, 80 acres are mature, complex forest with large conifers, deciduous trees and madrone, inhabited by many species of wildlife. The 80 acres of forest is the focus of Friends of Lincoln Park (FLiP).  We are a part of the Green Seattle Partnership (greenseattle.org), a partnership between the Seattle Parks Department and Forterra (formerly Cascade Land Conservancy), created in 2004, to restore and maintain Seattle’s forested parklands. Without our efforts, the mature forest of Lincoln Park would deteriorate, to a wasteland of holly, ivy, blackberries, etc. over the next 50 years.

The benefits of maintaining healthy urban forests include:
    *Making our community more attractive
   *Promoting active lifestyles
   *Reducing global warming
   *Providing wildlife habitat
   *Buffering noise
   *Reducing stormwater runoff and erosion
   *Improving air and water quality
   *Increasing property values

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